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20121202
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Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
over $250,000 a year that we should go. back to the rates that we had when bill clinton was president. >> i want to reform the tax codes so that it's fair. the same rate we had when bill clinton was president. >> we have to ask you and me and the wealthiest among us to go back to the clinton rates for income above $250,000. >> the clinton tax rates, we need to go back. that's not a generic policy idea. that's really specific. the clinton tax rate for high income earners was 39.6%. that's what president obama was calling for during the campaign. that's still what president obama is calling for now. but now when you ask him if that's the red line, if it you ask if he will accept anything else, he doesn't really answer. >> tax rates. are you -- is there no deal at the end of the year if tax rates for the top 2% aren't the clinton tax rates, period. no ifs, ands or buts on that specific aspect of the fiscal cliff. >> with respect to the tax rates, i want to emphasize, i am open to new ideas. i'm not going to slam the door in their face. i want to hear -- i want to hear ideas from everybod
under bill clinton. douglas, does this sound like code for a deal in the works? >> it certainly is good news that they aren't taking things off the table. i would be premature if i was celebrating a deal. there's a long way to go. it's important that they reach an agreement. the fiscal cliff is a very real danger to the united states economy. it's a recipe for a recession. and i certainly would not like to see the rhetoric that we saw from the treasury secretary tim geithner who said he's prepared to go over the fiscal cliff. that is not a good way to talk about what's going on right now. >> mr. reich, let me ask you the same thing. do you think there's code suggesting they are working towards something? because, doug, as you point out, the language was really harsh during this week. but all of a sudden, here we are friday evening and people are saying these kind of soft things that say maybe compromise. what do you think, robert? >> i think doug is right. it's too early to break out the champagne, but undoubtedly, the rhetoric is softening as we get closer and closer to the christmas h
we paid with bill clinton and cuts as well as human service cuts, that's how you ought to do it. any compromise is going to be for the cliff. i'm for the cliff. >> newt gingrich, now governor dean there. do you feel the same way? is that the best way for the president to go over the cliff? is it plausible deniability for boehner to say we stayed firm, we played "hardball"? >> james baker was on tv talking about it isn't for the right or left, republicans or democrats but what's best for the country. it's not best for the country to go over the cliff. it's not a cliff, it's a slow rolling hill. it's not really a cliff on january 1st. some things go into effect right away. others more spread out. they are problematic. if we go over, you are looking at a move in the markets. dow jones could fall 1,000 point ifs we go over the cliff. it's not good for the country. >> i find it ironic for the republican to be arguing for not reducing the deficit as much and the democrats talking about reducing the deficit. not only will the market go down but we'll have a recession. the market will go cra
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)

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